Type
N/A
Premiered
Jan. 04, 1964
Status
N/A
Runtime
N/A
Country
USA
Network
Genre

Top Contributors

No Image

Last Episode

N/A

Next Episode

new episode not currently scheduled
Add this show to your profile to be notified of any updates.

Character Guide

View All [14]

Series Fun Facts

More Trivia
  • Larri Thomas, a featured "Goldwyn Girl" in the classic Samuel Goldwyn film 1955 musical "Guys and Dolls", was the original 1964 "Hollywood Palace - Billboard Girl". At the end of each show,…
    [show]
    Larri Thomas, a featured "Goldwyn Girl" in the classic Samuel Goldwyn film 1955 musical "Guys and Dolls", was the original 1964 "Hollywood Palace - Billboard Girl". At the end of each show, Larri Thomas would join the Saturday's closing evening's show host, with the next week's "bill-board sheet"; handing the prop yellow "Play Bill" to the host, who announced the show's next Saturday night host and the variety show's line-up for featured guest talents. During the 1963-1964 CBS network television production season, Larri Thomas, with her husband Bruce Hoy, were part of choreographer Tom Hansen's team of dancers appearing on the CBS TV "Red Skelton Hour". Show rehearsals and taping schedules between the CBS Skelton show and the ABC Palace show conflicted. With the distance between the CBS-TV Fairfax at Beverly Boulevard studio and the Hollywood and Vine Hollywood Palace ABC-TV Studio cross town locations, Larri was frequently late. After the sixth show, missing preliminary "Hollywood Palace" tape day rehearsals. Vanoff replaced Larri Thomas with unknown Raquel Welch. In 1965, Larri became a featured dancer on the NBC-TV Studio-Burbank variety series "The Dean Martin Show". After Dean Martin hosted several "Hollywood Palace" shows, with minimum rehearsal, showing up to read the host cue cards for the taped (audience) 5:00 pm dress rehearsal and the 8:00 pm air show, Dean negotiated a very successful television variety series with NBC Television.
    [hide]
  • Hosting four shows in the third (1965-66) season, Fred Astaire was featured in his unique dance style in each show. Barrie Chase was his partner in his third and fourth appearances. During…
    [show]
    Hosting four shows in the third (1965-66) season, Fred Astaire was featured in his unique dance style in each show. Barrie Chase was his partner in his third and fourth appearances. During the taping of Fred's production dance number, director Grey Lockwood would stop the dance number, citing a technical problem, which allowed Astaire to catch his breath while pausing for a rest stop. Lockwood would resume the dance number after apologizing to Astaire for the "technical problem". For four of the Astaire-hosted shows his dance number was rehearsed on camera. with his pacing determining how many "technical problems" would occur. When the various segments of the dance number were finally edited together, the finished sequence appeared to be uninterrupted. Because of these appearances, Astaire produced his own Emmy-winning NBC dance special in 1967-68, utilizing James Trittipo as his production designer.
    [hide]
  • Many Hollywood revived and expanded their careers by appearing on the show. Dean Martin's hosting deal negotiated with producers Nick Vanoff and William O. Harbach allowed him to "sail into…
    [show]
    Many Hollywood revived and expanded their careers by appearing on the show. Dean Martin's hosting deal negotiated with producers Nick Vanoff and William O. Harbach allowed him to "sail into the theater" from the golf course, to tape the first (videotaped) rehearsal show, followed by the actual shows taping, with an hour crew-cast break; this allowed the audience to be turned around, director Grey Lockwood to give pick-up notes, and Jack Denton (IV) to correct lighting and/or re-jelling lamp fixtures. Martin's musical material had previously been rehearsed by the orchestra the night before,. The show was rehearsed with full cast minus Martin's participation, with "Woody", the Stage Manager, delivering the scripted introductions for the show's guests. Because the show was so easy for Martin to perform, he and his producer Greg Garrison were able to pitch a variety series starring Martin to rival NBC. Hosts Dan Rowan and Dick Martin later hosted "Laugh-In" (1967) on NBC. their hosting assignment by creating the "Laugh In" NBC TV Series. Fred Astaire and his production company taped a second special in 1967-68. The show's production designer, James Trittipo divided his responsibilities between the show and designing scenery for Astaire's special. Actually, Hub Braden, the Art Director, designed the Palace scenery while Trittipo was at NBC. Production manager Jerry McPhie commented that producer Nick Vanoff never knew that Trittipo was out of sight during the month of the special's production. He would show up on the day of taping and supervise in the control room booth.
    [hide]
You are successfully logged out.
login
[close]

ShareTV Login

Username
Password
Enter the text in the image shown if you are human.
WARNING: after 2 more failed attempts you will be locked out
[close]

Create Account

Username
Password
Verify Password
EMAIL

Verification code (check your email for the verification code)

Verification code has been sent to the following email address:
If you didn't receive the verification code:

1. Check your bulk/spam folder.

2. Try to whitelist our email address (noreply@sharetv.org)

3. Resend verification email

If you mistyped your email address change it here
Create a free ShareTV account to make a personalized schedule of your favorite TV shows, keep track of what you've watched, earn points and more.
Verify your username and email to complete your Registration
Enter the text in the image shown if you are human.
WARNING: after 2 more failed attempts you will be locked out
[close]

Forgot Your Password?

EMAIL
Enter the email address you used to create the account and your password will be emailed to you.