Trivia Facts | Top Quotes | Goofs/Mistakes
  • Based on the BBC series Steptoe and Son (UK). Several first season episodes of "Sanford and Son" were based on episodes from the earlier series.
  • In the second episode it is revealed that Lamont's middle name is Grady. But in Season 6 episode "The Lucky Streak," Fred admits that Lamont is his middle name and that he actually has no first name because he and Elizabeth never got around to it.
  • The producers' original choice for Lamont Sanford was Cleavon Little, who turned it down due to prior commitments. He suggested 'Redd Foxx' to them for the role of Fred Sanford.
  • The character Fred Sanford was named after Redd Foxx's brother.
  • Whitman Mayo's character "Grady Wilson" is actually named after actor Demond Wilson (Lamont Sanford). Demond Wilson's full name is "Grady Demond Wilson."
  • In the midst of filming episodes for the 1974 season, Redd Foxx had a feud with NBC when he demanded a salary that reflected the success of the show. Unable to reach an agreement Foxx walked off the show for the rest of the season and the producers were forced to create episodes around his absence. The continuity of the show explained that Fred Sanford was away in St. Louis attending his cousin's funeral and leaving his friend Grady (Whitman Mayo) in charge of the business. Oddly enough, this would turn out to be the highest rated season of the show's entire run.
  • Fred originally came from St. Louis, Missouri, which was the birthplace of series star Redd Foxx.
  • Besides Esther, Fred had five other sisters-in-law, Flossie, Minnie, Ethel, Rosetta and Hazel.
  • In the closing credits, the phrase "Sanford & Son was recorded on tape before a live audience" is spoken by Demond Wilson.
  • In one episode, Fred makes a reference to the Mayo Travel Agency. This was an actual business run by cast member Whitman Mayo who played Grady.
  • Chico, Julio's goat, was actually a female.
  • This show held the same time slot for its entire run, Friday nights at 8pm on NBC.
  • The front of the Sanford House, which doubles as the entrance to the Junk Store, appears in the opening credits but was never seen in an actual episode.
  • The character 'Fred Sanford' was ranked #42 in TV Guide's list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time" (20 June 2004 issue).
  • 'Redd Foxx' was a huge fan of the '30s vocal group The Ink Spots and sang many of their songs on the show. NBC would not pay the royalties because the cost was astronomical. So out of his love for the group Redd Foxx paid them out of his own pocket.
  • Redd Foxx and LaWanda Page had been friends since childhood, and she was his first and only choice to play Fred's sister-in-law Esther.
  • The actual title of the theme song is "The Streetbeater," written by Quincy Jones.
  • After the sixth season, Redd Foxx quit the show to do Redd Foxx. The series was set to continue with Demond Wilson (Lamont) as the lead. But Wilson left due to a salary dispute. The show was retooled and became "Sanford Arms" (1977).
  • The Sanfords' address was 9114 S. Central Avenue; Los Angeles, CA. As of 2010, if the junkyard actually existed, it would be located next to an office of the California Department of Corrections.
  • A running gag throughout the series was that whenever Lamont threatened to move out or whenever things did not go Fred's way, Fred would clutch his chest and fake having a heart attack, shouting out variations of "Hear that Elizabeth? I'm coming to join you honey!", yet in each and every instance, no one would fall for his ruse. Ironically, this running gag would years later be blamed for Redd Foxx's death (from a real heart attack) in 1991, during filming of the series The Royal Family, where no one took his legitimate complaints of chest pains seriously until it was too late to save his life.
  • Redd Foxx claimed that he had developed Fred's wobbly walk because at the beginning of the series they had given him heavy shoes.
  • The original idea for the show was that it would feature two Italian men because the network didn't think that black characters would work. A test screening was held with Paul Sorvino and Barney Hughes in the roles but the scene didn't work. Eventually, the network relented and let the characters be black.
  • CBS executive Fred Silverman was apprehensive about casting black actors for Sanford and Son because several of his previous shows involving black actors had failed. He thought that having Irish, Italian or Jewish characters would work better. So Silverman and producer Aaron Ruben took the show to NBC who loved the idea of having the show be about black junk men.
  • The show is a remake of a British series "Steptoe and Son" which ran for seven years. Initially co-writer Aaron Ruben thought that meant that the show had seven years worth of scripts to adapt. Unfortunately, the original show only produced four new episodes per season.
  • The network was not eager to cast Redd Foxx in the lead. Foxx had been a stand-up comedian whose material was very blue. In order to get the network to relent, a test screening was held at CBS (not NBC) with the network executives and the cast of Norman Lear's hit All in the Family in attendance. According to producer Aaron Ruben, the gag that eventually sold the show was Fred's fake heart attack. This also helped to prove that a black cast could lead the show.
  • This show has gone down in history as the show that killed The Brady Bunch. In 1974, both shows were on in the same time slot, Friday nights at 8pm, with Sanford and Son on NBC and The Brady Bunch on ABC. Through the entire 1973-74 season, Sanford beat Brady in the ratings until ABC finally pulled the plug.
  • Redd Foxx was suggested for the role after producer Bud Yorkin saw his performance in Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970).
  • According to show producer Bud Yorkin Redd Foxx was so generous with his money that he was often in debt. When this occurred he would tell the show's producers that he was sick and that his doctor said he wasn't eating enough. The only cure, he said, was that he needed to be making more money. This is similar to what Fred would do on the show with the fake heart attacks.
  • Fred Sanford is, without fail, always shown wearing long sleeved shirts/jackets, etc. This is because Redd Foxx had a fairly prominent tattoo of a naked lady on his right forearm, which, of course, could not be shown on television.
  • In the midst of taping episodes for the 1973-1974 season, Redd Foxx walked off the show in a salary dispute. His character was written out of the series for the rest of the season. The continuity of the show explained that Fred Sanford was away in St. Louis attending his cousin's funeral and leaving his friend Whitman Mayo in charge of the business. NBC sued Foxx and as part of the settlement, Foxx later returned. Foxx had taped fewer than ten episodes before Fred 'left for St. Louis.'

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